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Full text of "The beamer : Bradford Durfee Textile School yearbook"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/beamerbradforddu1926brad 



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Before passing to further contents of this 
Record, let us pause a moment and give praise 
to each mernber of the Staff, who by his diligent 
and faithful work has made this Record possible. 
Also those who have been so kind as to aid us 
in any way, accept our heartfelt gratitude and 
most sincere thanks. 

May we also thank our advertisers, it is to 
them we owe the financial success of this book, 
so dear reader spend as much time looking at 
the last part of this book as you do the first. 



PAGE EIGHT 



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As some of us already know, the Textile Industry of to-day, 
is one of the ranking fields of industry, and to begin to estimate the 
value of this industry would be a task which would take up too 
much space and a like amount of time. However, there are a few 
facts which would interest the average person to the extent of giving 
them a fair idea of what the industry (and education to it) means 
to this country. 

First and foremost, we can safely say that Fall River is the 
leading cotton manufacturing town in the country and to prove 
this fact, we have at present, one-ninth of all the cotton spindles of 
the United States right here in Fall River, numbering some 
4.000,000. This can give you a fair idea of the cotton cloth pro- 
duced in this city when the total spindles of the country are some 
35,000,000. Now comes the problem, how are we to secure 
experienced men to handle this task of managing the industry 
without having to subject them to fifteen or twenty years of actual 
mill experience. The solution found was, first to secure a number 
of schools in different cotton manufacturing sections of the country 
in which cotton manufacturing leads, and in these schools place 
men who have had enough practical experience to teach these 
younger nen the ins and outs of the industry. That, was quite a 
few years ago, and to-day we see the fruits of that effort. A 
student who is trained, to know cotton machinery, the effects 
different machines will produce, to know a loom and what can be 
made on it, how the product is bleached, dyed and finished, and 
in short a general knowledge of the textile industry from the 
breaker to the dyed and finished piece. 

By this, you can readily see that a Textile student of to-day 
has the same training that the average college student has in his 
field of work, and his course means the same to him as does the 
college students. In college the student, (that is the general 
student) specializes in some certain subject such as engineering; so 
it is in the Textile school. The student takes up some course 



PAGE NINE 



©ft* ®exttle JUcorh 



that will limit him to the work for which he thinks himself 
best suited. We have at this school courses in the following : 
General Cotton Manufacturing, Designing and Weaving, Chemistry 
and Dyeing, and Engineering. 

This does not mean that a student must take one of these 
courses. He may, if he caies to, specialize in any one or two sub- 
jects of any course, this is an advantage as some students desire 
to become specialists in certain fields of the industry. 

From this brief description you may see that a man really 
has a fine start in the Textile world and the progress that he can 
make is entirely up to himself. Another great advantage that our 
students have, is that the school through our principal Mr. Nichols 
will try to place the student in some firm or mill that has an open- 
ing, so you can readily see that with all these opportunities a 
young man can make a great future for himself with the benefits 
derived from the Textile Schools. 

Charlks M. Hayman '26 



BOYS 

" I took a piece of plastic clay 
And idly fashioned it one day ; 
And as my fingers pressed it still 
It bent and yielded to my will. 

' ' I came again when days were past 
The bit of clay was hard at last. 
My early impress still it bore, 
And I could change its form no more. 

" You took a piece of living clay 
And gently formed it day by day, 
And moulded with your power and art 
A young boy's soft and yielding heart. 

"You come again when years are gone, 
It is a man you look upon. 
Your early impress still he bore, 
And you can change him never more." 
— Y. M. C. A. News 



PAGE TEN 



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THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief 
Louis J. Boxser 

Business and Advertising Manager 
Charles M. Hayman 

Assistant Advertising Manager 
Samuel Lovit 



Jokes 
Thomas A. McCann 



Literary 
David L. Posnak 



Cartoons 
William Masterson 



Sports 
Randolph MacBeath 
Walter Marston 



CivASS History 
Thomas Gracia 



Class Activities 
Earl B. Ellis 



PAGE ELEVEN 



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PAGE TWELVE 



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PRINCIPAL 

Henry W. Nichols, A. B. 

Assistant Principal 
William E. Drake, B. S. 

Designing and Analysis 
Frederick B Hays 

Cotton Yarn Preparation Department 
William A. Goss 

Assistant 
Harold C. Smith 

Warp Preparation and Weaving Departments 
John W. Norman 

Assistant 
Thomas Jones 

Engineering Department 
William E. Drake, B. S. 

Assistants 

Mechanical Drawing Machine Shop 

Edward V. Carroll, B. S. John J. Crawford 

Chemistry and Dyeing Departments 
C. Nelson Alderman 

Assistants 
James Worton, B. S. James McArdle 

Freehand Drawing Department 
Lucien Schimpf 

Head of Extension Work 
William H. Broomhead 

Margaret E. Morgan, Bursar Gertrude F. Horan, Registrar 

John J. Munroe, Engineer 



PAGE THIRTEEN 



®ljs ffiexttU JEecorh 




"Louie" 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Sigma Phi Tau, 1, 2 
Scribe 2 
Glee Club 1 



LOUIS J. BOXSER 

"Jonah" "Nisha" 

B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Ring Committee 2 
Social Committee 2 
Editor-in-Chief Record Book 



" In union there is strength " 

The world at large lost a promising young doctor when k Louie' ' 
gave up that profession to follow Chemistry at our school. ' Jonah" 
was a speed king in his class work, always striving to get ahead 
(he needed one) in practical work as well as in book learning. 
Once out of school "The Boxser" had several activities that oc- 
cupied considerable time, but by far the most outstanding diversion 
was "Louie's" trip to Prospect Street to see "His Marie." 

The noise made by "The Gargling Trio," composed of 
Boxser, Posnak and L,ovit will cease this year at graduation, but 
their teachings will live on forever. Ask McArdle and McCann. 

Well good luck "Louie" in your coming business career and 
may you be as successful in life as you have been at school. 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



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JEFFERSON BORDEN 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Social Committee 2 



Exeter 



Curly haired, sleeveless, match in mouth, and there you have 
our Jefferson Borden 4th. A whiz on radio, a flash on the dance 
floor, a crack at swimming, a keen sportsman, and that isn't all. 
His arguments in the lab with "Sammy" are quite a feature to 
witness, although 'Sammy' refuses to give up, "Jeff" is a 
quiet, very ^ood natured chap. His hobby is to take the after- 
noon off occasionally to see the picture shows. Another one of 
his interesting habits was to analyze a piece of pie when Mr Alder- 
man wasn't looking. 

It looks as though "Jeff" will be one of the supporting 
pillars of the F'all River Bleachery, in the role of chief chemist, in 
which, the task of saving the plant many thousands of dollars will 
rest on his most capable shoulders. 

The good wishes of his classmates go with him in this new 
field of endeavor. 



PAGE FIFTEEN 



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Chemistry 

Phi Psi 

Manager Baseball 2 



JAMES M. CONNOR 

B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Basketball 1, 2 
Glee Club 1 



"Quality not quantity is of prime importance." 

Clank, clank, clank, don't be surprised for it is the 
chemistry's one and only class shiek. James Michael Connor 
minus his rubber heels. "What no women," is 'Jim's" favorite 
saying. 'Mike" by his own personal endeavor beat out the 
only one legged fellow in the school in the Charleston honors, by 
one vote (his own.) 

Well, leaving all jokes aside, ' Jimmy " is a real ladies' man 
and he sure can knock 'em off, as the saying goes. He has a 
mean line (clothes line) and can never be fooled, even by the 
prettiest woman. 

"Jimmy " played basketball for two years and he sure has a 
mean eye on the hoop and on account of his baseball ability, he 
was elected manager of the '26 outfit. 

All in all " Jimmy " has a pleasant character and is very good 
natured. We are sure that "Mike" will succeed in taking any 
honors that he may try for. 



PAGE SIXTEEN 



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THEODORE V. DEANE 



k \Thede " 

General Cotton Course 
Phi Psi 



" Shiek" 
Middleboro High School 

Class Treasurer 



From out of the brush and undergrowth of the wilderness 
surrounding the thriving town of Middleboro came "Thede" 
Deane to learn the ways of the world. He came, he saw, and he 
conquered (HER). 

Deane should go far, there's no stopping a man with his 
nerve and brains. A product of Middleboro High and a protege 
of Sherman Munroe of '25, what more could be expected. See 
what's happened to Sherman. He who plays must pay, but 
now you've got to go to work. 

May good fortune and success find your door. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 



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EARIv B. ELLIS 
" Hank" "Elly" 
Engineering B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Record Book Staff 
" Do unto others before they do you " 

" Hank " Ellis' main ambition is to be a mechanical engineer. 
He is a quiet natured chap, known as the ladies' man of the class. 
" Hank " hopes to obtain a position with a concern that pays 
fifty dollars a week watching some one else do the work. 

41 Hank" is a popular man, especially in Swansea, Tiverton 
and all other social centers. He is seldom seen of an evening 
without his "tux." 

We all wish him the best of luck in whatever task he under- 
takes and we're sure he will make good. His motto alone assures 
success. 



PAGE EIGHTEEN 



3% textile ^ttoxb 




JOHN Iv. FIELDS 

"Slipper" 
General Cotton Taunton High School 

Baseball 

Here we have him, the only known John "Slipper" Fields, 
the one who has guided the cotton class of '26, through the trials 
and tribulations of three long but not to be forgotten years. John 
can tell you more about the history of Taunton than can any other 
person or persons from that lk big" city. He can also tell a lot 
more but we will not dwell upon it. 

We hope that John, in his quiet and simple way, will also 
some day be a great textile magnate. 

John has quietly pursued the cotton course for the past three 
years and intends to keep on in this line if possible. We all wish 
him success in all his undertakings and know with his guiding 
ways he is bound to succeed. 



PAGE NINETEEN 



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THOMAS GRACIA 
1 ' Tommy ' ' 



General Cottton Class 
Baseball 1, 2, 3 



Taunton High School 

President Phi Psi 3 



Member Advisory Board 3 
"A rolling stone gathers no moss t but my what a polish" 

Out from the ' wilds" of Taunton came "Tommy, "and, like a 
beast from a cage he has caused turmoil in the cotton class for the 
past three years. 

We all agree that " Tommy " is a good student and so does 
"Tommy." The time he has not spent with his fraternity and 
women he has endeavored to show the cotton class boys up with 
his hurried ways. We all know he will succeed in this great 
world, because it will not be his fault if he doesn't. Ambition 
just naturally comes his way (sometimes.) 

"Tommy" has been known as " Th.eSh.adow> " this name 
being applied by one of his favorite teachers. 

"Tommy's" favorite pastime is to proudly exhibit the coat- 
of-arms which he traced so cleverly. 

Nevertheless, we wish good luck to the one and only "miracle 
man " of the school. 



r 



PAGE TWENTY 



tEIje tEexttle ^t&ttavh 




" Chuck" 



CHARLES M. HAYMAN 

1 ' Duke ' ' 
Designing and Weaving 



Charlie ' ' 



Textile Brotherhood Club 1 

Secretary 

Sigma Phi Tau 1, 2 

Scribe 1 

Councillor 2 

Basketball 2 

Advertising and Business Manager Class Year Book 



Glee Club 1 

Cheer Leader 1 

Assistant Basketball Manager 2 

Social Committee 1, 2 

Dance Committee 1, 2 



"A task well doing, is worth doing well" 

L,o and behold girls the shield yes sir, this is Charlie my boy. 
Here you see the fellow whom they wrote a song about. Charlie 
stands Al with the ladies, probably owing to his dancing ability. 
He was popular with the fellows too, anytime you felt dull, all you 
had to do was to go to the <k Duke's" room and you were always 
sure to find a crowd and pass a pleasant evening. He was a good 
scholar and his standing here at Textile was quite high. His 
favorite hobby was to be ahead of the cotton class. *' Chuck " 
has certainly turned out some very good work here at Textile 
scholastically and socially. 

Well, "Chuck" old boy, we wish you lots of luck, so hop to it 
boy and show 'em all that we see in you. 



PAGE TWENTY-ONE 



®lje tttsxitle ^etovb 




" Herby'> 
Engineering 



HERBERT J. LIMNEY 

" Gus" 
B. M. C. Durfee High School 



Early to bed and early to rise, 

Don't touch a live wire for you'll get a surprise. 

Herbert "Gus"L,inney is a good natured young man who's only 
rival with the girls is Rudolph Valentino. His main ambition in 
life is to have a position at large pay as draftsman (opening and 
closing windows) for a large manufacturing concern. Herby's 
only ambition other than a position is to settle down in a cottage 
small by a waterfall. We don't mean all alone nor maybe. 

In what ever part of life he should take we know that he will 
make good. We all wish him success and good fortune. 



PAGE TWENTY-TWO 



®ljc ®exttle JUcorh 




SAMUKIv IvOVIT 



"Sam" 

Chemistry and Dyeing 

Sigma Phi Tau 1, 2 
Exchequer Sigma Phi Tau 2 



' ' Murphy ' ' 

B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Glee Club 1 
(Class Salesman) 



The name " Sam " is a by-word in the Dye Lab. and when- 
ever you hear Sam's voice rather high pitched you can be sure 
$alesman fam is at it again. His greatest sale was selling a suit to 
McCann. The following day Art came to Sam and said. " Say 
what's the idea, look at these moth holes, there are moths in this 
suit." Sam snapped back, " Well, what do you want for $10.95, 
humming birds ?" Sam's greatest bargain sold for 3 for 25 cents. 

All in all, he is a good skate and always has a smile under 
his broad Roman nose, his mind is as broad as his nose — and 
that's broad. 

Well, Sam, our sincerest wishes are with you for health, 
wealth and happiness, which we know you will make for yourself, 
for your smile will win you your way. 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



tErje ®*xiiie Jiecorfr 




RANDOLPH P. MACBEATH 
1 ' Ranny " " Scotchy " " Benzine C6h6 ' ' 

Chemistry B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Vice President Phi Psi 2 Secretary A. A. A. 2 

Glee Club 1 Social Committee 1, 2 

Basketball Manager 2 Chairman Ring Committee 2 

Vice President of Class 2 Baseball 1, 2 

Sports Writer, Year Book 

"A penny saved is a penny gained" 

" Ranny," as he is called, by all who know him and know 
him well with the possible exception of McCann to whom he is 
and always will be just plain " Scotchy." 

' Scotchy " has been one of the leading players on our basket- 
ball team for the last two years, both in scoring as well as in play- 
ing ability. The student body elected him as manger of this 
sport for the year '26. 

With his graduation this year, the great works of Marston- 
MacBeath, Inc., will be demolished. These two men are known 
as the " couple dyers " because of their speed in doing the various 
experiments in a minimum amount of time, as well as with the 
same amount of stock. 

Well good luck " Ranny " in what ever field of industry you 
may choose. We know you will succeed. 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



tJElje tEexltie JRcrorh 




WALTER E. MARSTON 



Hook ' 



" #^7#" 



Chemistry 

President of Athletic Association 2 
Chairman of Social Committee 2 
Assistant Manager of Basketball 1 
Father of Class 2 
Social Committee 1 

"To Be or not to Be" 



B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Ring Committee 
Basketball 1 
Baseball 1, 2 
Glee Club 1 
Phi Psi 

- "Be What?" 



Soliquizes the mob. 

"A Chemist and Technician," responds the fair youngVicking 
of the Maplewood district. Yes, Walt joined us, and being one of 
those little pugnacious fellows drained the cup of knowledge and 
he will now leave us endeavoring to make the world know that he 
has discovered the " Philospher's Stone." 

" Hook " was one of the elite at the social affairs and a star 
on the diamond. He was a pitcher of no mean ability but occa- 
sionally he received his "Bumps' like the pitcher that was 
brought to the well once too often. 

When you finally settle down and exemplify your life to your 
children we hope it will be examples of your success. 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



"(Eire textile T&etavb 




General Cotton Class 
Phi Psi 
Glee Club 
Record Book Staff 



WIIvLIAM H. MASTKRSON 

' ' Sc up ' ' 

Taunton High School 
Baseball '25, '26 

Vice President Athletic Association I 
General Cotton Course 



Where ever you may go your fame precedes you and such 
was the case of William Hoyle Masterson, familiarly known by the 
famous family name of " Scup." Women Beware! Look to 
your hearts and take care. Many a fair lass is pining and eating 
her heart away, while this merciless brute they call <k Scup" looks 
about for new hearts to conquer and subdue. It will be a great 
day indeed when someone with an arm stronger than her heart 
leads him masterfully to the altar. We will make that day a 
national holiday. Ah ! Farewell William Hoyle if you would only 
k ' Live and let live.' ' 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 



®Ije (Rtxtilt JRecorh 




THOMAS A. McCANN 



"Art" 
Chemistry and Dyeing 
Phi Psi 1, 2 
Basketball 1, 2 
Baseball 1, 2 
Captain 2 



Mac 



B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Glee Club 1 
Record Book Staff 
(Original gloom choir) 



" It's a smile that conquers a frown." 

Well, folks, gaze on the countenance of Thomas A., better 
known as " Art " or " Mac." 

You might have just as well predicted bad weather as to say, 
" Art " may not be there. " Art's " ever wide smile and humor- 
ous sayings have brightened up the dark spots of the " L,ab." 
Always a successful arbitrator and all around good sport. "Mac" 
has made a real title for himself on the diamond and around the 
hoop. His second year at Textile saw him Captain of our base- 
ball team and on the basketball floor he was a very strong spoke 
in the wheel. We will always remember "Mac's" sterling 
guarding. 

Well, '* Mac " we are going to miss you, but our parting word 
is, good luck and success to you, and keep smiling, the world 
loves a smile. 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



'(Elje textile JRstorh 




DAVID D. POSNAK 

1 ' Dave " " Puzzy ' ' 

Chemistry and Dyeing B. M. C. Durfee High School 

Basketball 1 Glee Club 1 

Baseball 1, 2 Literary Year Book 

Cheering Squad 6 
Corresponding Scribe, Sigma Phi Tau 2 



Social 1, 2 



" Puzzy " is one of the most aggressive members of an equally 
aggressive class, although his looks belie these words, albeit the 
innocent look. 

Although a product of the Flint Village, a fact which should 
not be held against him, his diligence and application in solving 
the mysteries of chemistry and dyeing, is to be admired inasmuch 
as it had earned for him the distinction of being night instructor 
in his second year. 

Another side of Dave's personality is his great attraction for 
the opposite sex. School teachers being his hobby, since several 
of them have " fallen " for his masculine and masterful wooing. 

The best wishes of all his classmates go with him and the best 
of luck to you Dave, old boy. 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



^\\t ^txtxit ^ttuxb 




LENDELD h. RUDOLPH 
' ' Plow Jockey " " Rudy ' ' 

Chemistry and Dyeing Taunton High School 

(Explosion Champion) 

" Rudy " we call hitn but his mother calls him Lendell. He 
ends the name with Rudolph. Yes, "Rudy" is a real he man from 
Taunton. He has a strong dislike for the girls with the possible 
exception of one, of course that is most always the case. We were 
disappointed that " Rudy " did not give us his picture in water 
colors, as we wanted you to see his school boy complexion. 

All joking aside "Rudy" is a real scholar. He won the 
scholarship awarded by the Textile Chemists and Colorists. Be- 
sides this honor his classmates have bestowed upon him the title 
of " Explosion Champion." 

" Rudy " is famous for his coat, which is a massive object. 
His reason for the constant use of this coat is on account of the 
heavy fogs that hover in the vicinity of Brockton where he is said 
to spend much of his time with that certain one. 

Well " Rudy " we all expect big things of you and we know 
that you are going to be a real success, so good luck and good 
fortune. 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



®lje textile l&ttaxb 



^ovxnb £bant £ ci}OQ/ 



Mr. Norman is seriously thinking of speeding up the gearing 
on the elevator so that he won't lose time traveling between floors. 

Mr. Worton, our coach, is going to spend the summer resting 
his nerves after a strenuous season with the various teams. 

Mr. Alderman, we hear, is going to train his youngster for 
future professorship in Chemistry at one of the leading colleges. 

Mr. Goss is going to equip all of the carding machinery with 
alarm clocks to let the students know when 4.30 arrives. 

Mr. Crawford may let his hair grow and wear a black winsor 
tie for the benefit of ,next years orchestra. 

Mr. Hays is thinking of putting stained glass in the windows 
to save us from the fair damsels on the porches. 

Mr. Jones is going to write a novel this summer on "Why do 
Men Wear Brown Hats ?" 

Mr. McArdle is known as the other Siamese Twin, demonstrated 
daily at lunch time. 

Mr. Broomhead's latest novel contains a short story about, 
" Smooth Billy and the Leather Medal." 

Mr. Drake will always be remembered by the boys as "the 
Good Samaritan," in the slide rule class. 

Mr. Schimpf receives a new wuler and waser for his efforts in 
bringing us to a higher grade of go getters. (not goat getters) 

Mr. Smith will also receive a gift and that is of a hand em- 
broidered hand towel and a lock and key for his tools. 

Mr. Nichols may place an alarm or siren in the entrances that 
operates after 8.30 A. M. and 1.30 P. M. and before 4.30 P. M. 

John is going to buy a flash light for use at the school dances. 

John Munroe is installing a new voltage meter that cannot 
indicate over 250 Watts. 

Miss Morgan is buying an automatic writing machine to write 
out receipts for school supplies. 

Miss Horan is going to take up the mute language. 



PAGE THIRTY 



®lje textile Jlecorfc 



jUtstorg of % Cotton Class of 1925 



On the seventeenth of September, 1923, there came to the 
Bradford Durfee Textile School a number of youths, fresh from the 
High Schools of various cities and towns to enroll in the Cotton 
Course. It is upon the history of these students that I shall at- 
tempt to dwell. 

We were a quiet group of young men at that time with one 
main thought uppermost in our minds, the desire for knowledge. 

The first few months of school found us engrossed in 
solving the intricacies of the different branches of cotton manu- 
facturing. We were a small class, but this part did not worry us, 
since we had the idea that the proverb "Quality and not quantity" 
just about fitted us. 

For the greater part of the first year we seemed to be satisfy- 
ing ourselves as to our standing in our school studies, but slowly 
and surely there seemed to be a change coming over us, as is 
always the case in the growth of all animal life. We were seen 
about frequently and heard of quite often. 

While we had always been accustomed to hearing our worthy 
instructors and "slave drivers" call us a model class and one of the 
best cotton classes assembled, there now came rumors to our ears 
that all was not serene with our trusted faculty. In our work rooms 
we would often catch suspicious glances cast our way from the 
watchful eyes of our "guards," and we often wondered if it could 
be possible that we were suspected of wrong-doing. 

From then on we were always in trouble. The first year 
passed rather quickly and fairly successful for us, even though we 
were nearly blown up a score of times by the hazardous experi- 
ments of our Chinese classmate, "Billy." 

We will never forget how"Thede" Deane came to school on 
his entrance day in the company of ahorse and buggy, even though 
he tells everyone that he did not. Also we will hardly ever forget 
the day "Smiling Slipper" Field really smiled and spoke to us. 
That smile was deserved, because we worked a long time for it and 



PAGE THIRTY-ONE 



'(Eije ^Itxtilt JRetnrfr 



thereafter as a reward for that smile we brought all our troubles to 
"Slipper." 

Thus ended the .first year of our course and we really did 
learn something, thanks to the teachings of our instructors. 

We came back in the fall to resume our studies again and 
found much to our sorrow that our classmate "Billy Wu" had not 
returned, but we soon got over that and started to work in earnest. 
Probably the greatest event of the year was the production of our 
ginghams and shirtings. It may be that they did not startle the 
textile world, but. at any rate, they did startle the school. They 
seemed to be the source of much discussion for many following 
days and also, I am sorry to say, much laughter, especially by the 
upper classmen, but it was no laughing matter to us, for it repre- 
sented hours of whole hearted work and we really believed them to 
be a credit to ourselves and the school. We know better now, but 
we honestly tried hard. 

Aside from our actual school work we were giving our in- 
structors much toy worry over. I still believe that Mr. Goss really 
thinks that one member of our class actually tried to hit him on the 
head with a bobbin, while he was at work around some shafting. 
Also, I know that Mr. Crawford really enjoyed our class glee club, 
although he hated to admit it, but we want him to know that we 
enjoyed his selection of "Marchita" even though he locked the 
doors of the assembly hall when he began to sing. 

And so the second year went on while we struggled harder 
and harder absorbing little by little the principles of cotton manu- 
facturing. 

Our last year is well on its way and we shall soon leave this 
institution and shall probably never enter it again in the role of a 
student. Our school days are growing shorter and we are begin- 
ning to realize that every day we spend in school is invaluable to us. 

How time flys. It seems only yesterday that we entered and 

now we are about to leave. The time is rapidly approaching when 

we must find means of our own livelihood. While we realize every 

day how little we actually know, we hope, that what little we have 

learned will make life smoother for us. 

As we are leaving we sincerely hope that we leave with no 
petty grievances behind us and also with the friendship and good 
wishes of all. 

To our fellow students, instructors and principal, we, the 
Cotton Class of 1926, bid you farewell. 



Thomas Gracia, 

Cotton Class of 1926. 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



®{jb ®exitle ^etorh 



u (&\\tm" (Ela^s ^fetnrg 



Boom ! ! Bang ! ! Crash ! ! Don't be alarmed for it is only 
one of Lendell Rudolph's experiments going up in the air. These 
were frequent events when he began some experiments of his own 
invention, but after two short years have passed, the instigator 
of these noises is still in the best of health (likewise our nerves) 
while the only damage done was to the ceiling, which was too slow 
to get out of the way, for here is where the " fruit "of kk Rudy's" 
labor usually landed. 

By now, dear reader, we have attracted enough interest to 
allow us to proceed with the history of this Chemistry Class 
of 1926. 

Two years ago, eleven young and ambitious men entered the 
portals of this school with thoughts of becoming Chemists of great 
renown. At first we were very ignorant of the details of chemistry 
and dyeing, but slowly and surely we learned not to cool boiling 
sulphide acid with cold water or to boil out a woolen skein in 
caustic soda. Slowly but surely we acquired an assurance in the 
manipulation of an instrument and so the awkwardness of the 
beginner was a thing of the past. 

The last half of the first year was an initiation into the mys- 
teries of qualitative analysis and soon we were in pursuit of that 
elusive thing k4 known as an unknown." 

The second year brought back nine men, Francis Griffin having 
secured a position in the " lab " at the New England Oil Refinery 
and John Flynn, whose aspirations were a University course at 
Yale. 

Nine hopefuls returned, with the flames of ambition burning 

.as bright as ever, even as high as the flames of burning 

ether, yet not as strong as our ambitions, since ether flames are 

easily extinguished by Mr. McArdle and his trusty Pyrene 

extinguisher. 



PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



^i\t QltxtxU jRttovb 



Quantitative analysis and advanced dyeing, together with 
Organic Chemistry next claimed our ambitions and " midnight 
oil" sun and exotic pleasures were a thing of the past. Mid- 
year came and passed, leaving us unscathed. Volumeteric and 
technical analysis were new mysteries that confronted our startled 
visages. Notwithstanding these, we had our own pleasures. 

But during these last two years, although we worked hard 
and did) our lessons faithfully, we also had our pleasures. " Art " 
McCann kept us in hysterics with his witty remarks, while "Sam" 
Lovit had the class on its toes by putting out his special offers on 
raincoats, clothing, etc. Louis "Jonah" Boxser would give us 
all a good time telling us of his feminine conquests. " Hook " 
Marston would usually demonstrate what he would do to 
" Strangler " Lewis if he had him on the mat and we really think 
that he would give the " strangler " the battle of his life. Mac- 
Beath better known as " Scotchie," a name bestowed on him by 
"Art" McCann, would always monopolize the distilled water 
giving no one else a chance. " Jeff " Borden, the fourth, was as 
fast out of the water as he was in the water. He demonstrated 
this by leaving the class room before the bell rang. "Dave" 
Posnak would delight in picking an argument with "Sid" Springer 
of the first year class and he usually came out on top ; and little 
" Jim" Connor would make us all laugh by springing a joke at 
the right time. Besides these characteristics I believe we were all 
guilty of eating pies. 

The year now draws to a close and soon we will all be out 
into the " cold, cold world," and entered into the ranks of that 
class of trained men, in whose hearts is set a purpose and the will 
to carry on. Farewell, men of '26. 

D. L. P. '26 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



©Jje ^Textile ^tcavb 



^^tgntng anb pfeafrmg 



The Designing and Weaving Class this term was quite small, 
it consisted of only two men, Charles M. Hayman and Frank Fyans. 
Frank was specializing in cloth analysis while "Chuck" was taking 
the full course. 

"Frank" and 'Chuck" had some lively contests as to each 
other's class rating, the climax came when "Chuck's" sporting 
blood prompted him to take "Frank's" bet of five dollars that he 
"Chuck" would not receive 100% in the coming examination. The 
exam came and went and as hard as k 'The Duke" tried, the best 
he received was 99%, of course Charlie lost the bet but as Frank 
was two points below him it was a moral victory for Charlie. 

A very pleasant year passed between these two good friends 
and upon returning the following year, Charlie found that his pal 
Frank had married during the last term, this left "The Duke" all 
alone, but as Charlie says, "He works fastest who works alone," 
and we believe him for when it comes to women, fast isn't the word. 

Charlie has been a very ardent worker for the school and due 
credit should be given him. He served on all our dance and social 
committees. Besides serving in this capacity, he was our best en- 
tertainer. The crowd was in for a treat when they had Charlie do 
an exhibition dance, there wasn't a step he couldn't do and do to 
perfection. Another thing "The Duke" has to his credit was the 
organizing of a bus trip to IyOwell in 1925. His work helped stim- 
ulate the spirit of the students in getting behind their basketball 
team. He was also our cheer leader for 1924-1925. 



PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



%\\t ^txtxit H&ttvxb 



It was Charlie's pep and "go-get-em" spirit that helped put 
over the year book, the Senior class publication, he was our bus- 
iness and advertising manager and his task was one that required 
no little effort. He sure did collect some ads and put out a beauti- 
ful book as you see. 

Besides all this "Chuck" has left behind him apiece of work 
that cannot be forgotten and whenever it is mentioned, his name 
will be linked with it and that is The Gamma Chapter of the Sigma 
Phi Tau Fraternity. He is the Councillor and has lead the way 
to a very successful year which caused his chapter to rise to dizzy 
heights amongst the textile fraternities of this section, all due to 
"Chuck's" leadership and executive ability. 

Well, we hope the "The Duke" is as successful in the big 
wide world as he was here at Textile, so here's success and good 
luck to a worker. 

S. I*. 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 



tElje ®extik JUcorh 



Pt0tnrg af ^ngmeering (Ela** of '2fi 

In the fall of 1924 six men entered this school with the idea 
of becoming great engineers. However, after their first year of 
school four of them were offered positions with different concerns 
and decided to remain there when school opened in the fall of 1925. 
During their year at school and the 4k go-get-em " spirit in which 
they did their work, they acquired enough knowledge to start them 
on their life's journey. 

Tne two men who returned to school, Herbert L,inney and 
Earl Ellis, decided that if they wished to become the great en- 
gineers of which they dreamed, they had to work in earnest and be- 
ganthe year by doing so. However, all was not study as it seemed. 
Almost every morning, afternoon and . . . evening ? one could 
see " Linney " meeting his sweet * 'patootie" on the corner of 
Central and Main. About Earl one couldn't say, because we 
haven't had the pleasure of seeing him with his, but he sure did 
love his pipe as well as anything. Every morning and noontime 
one could see him at the side entrance puffing away at his corn 
"cob" affectionately. Now that their school term and their 
school work are almost completed their visions are about to come 
to a realization. 

When they begin their work, we want them to remember that 
the good wishes of the class of 1928 are with them and we bid them 
farewell. 

H. E. '26. 



PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



t&Jje textile ^ttovb 



Cottrm (Ulas* l^ropljetg 



In this great school of ours we learn to weave the warp and 
weft, different yarns are used, different colors are used, various 
combinations are taken and many other things come into play. 
It is the same in this great life of ours, we are continually weav- 
ing a pattern each one taking his warp and filling and producing 
a wonderful design. 

In the year 1946 we unroll the cloth and we see the patterns 
that have been made in the years gone by. 

First, we see a little loom, on the top we can just about see 
the initials J. L- F. Now lets see J. L. F , why that could be no 
other than our schoolmate "Slipper" Fields. Let us look more 
closely. This cloth is made of the finest silk, modest colors and a 
very pleasing pattern. Those were his school days, quiet, inelab- 
orate, but effective. Gradually from his first position of assembling 
draw frames for the "Mason Machine- Works of Taunton" we see 
his progress, until now he is the wealthy manufacturer of his in- 
vention "Jack Combers." A very great machine for the hair. 

Next we see a great loom with the initials T. G. and we im- 
mediately recognize this as the initials of our old pal Thomas Gracia. 
This cloth has many bright colors and looks as if it were made in 
some warmer climate under a tropical sun, yes, it is from South 
America. We see a large mansion with beautiful grounds, a prod- 
uct of "Tom's" labor in his successful rise to one of the leading 
cotton manufacturers of the southern continent. 

Here is a third loom with a tag reading "Scup." That is 
William Hoyle Masterson. On this pattern we see all sorts of 
Chinese symbols and signs. After leaving school "Scup" was 
given a position for five years putting up looms in Hong Kong, 
China for the Draper Loom Corp. After five years had passed he 
built a mill of his own and now he employes thousands of Chinese 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



^[\\t textile JRcrcrh 



in this huge plant. Afternoons and evenings he instructs his men 
in the art of the great American game of baseball and to date his 
team, "The Yellow Jackets" have not been beaten. 

Here we come to a Jacquard and although the intitials are 
not plain we immediately recognize the cloth as the character of 
Theodore Deane. The pattern is not elaborate upon first inspec- 
tion but as we look closer we see that it is a piece of work that re- 
quired time and great efforts and that it is symbolic of our pal 
"Thede." The moral is, "Outward appearances are often deceiv- 
ing," for though Deane did not make much noise, or shout his 
knowlege and wisdom, he was a worker and a thinker and a scholar 
that we were proud to call a classmate. 

Here we come to a loom that is still running and for the un- 
tiring effort that it portrays to us we know that it must be an old 
pal who although took a different course, was with us in most of 
our classes. This we know must be Charles M. Hayman. His 
pattern shows the fruits of real labor and the cloth is of finest yarns 
with strong but not too bright colors. And so was "Charlie" a 
diligent worker who gave his best to his Alma Mater. A fellow 
who would stand his ground when in the right and who held his 
friendships dear. 

And so we see the products of life and learn that to get the 
best we must give the best, and we are sure that when the looms 
are worn and tired there will be no cloth that is not a credit to its 
source of production. 

T. V. D. '26 



PAGE THIRTY N INE 



®lje Qltxtxlt H&etaxb 



^tltst of pfimters of prizes, ^eoal ano Jirtroiargljtpg 

Tgear 1924-1925 



Jxomono Cote Prt2£g 

George L. Mills Best Jaequard Pattern 3rd year General Cotton 
Manufacturing. Twenty Dollars. 

John Iy. Field Best Gingham Pattern 2nd year General Cotton 
Manufacturing. Fifteen Dollars. 

Patrick J. Walsh, Jr. Highest Yearly Rating 1st year General 
Cotton Manufacturing. 



^eoal of ^National ^generation of (Eoiion ( Mamtla.ttnv£v& 
Bernard Golding 3rd year General Cotton Manufacturing 



JitfynJargljttfg 
Karle P. Charlton, Jr. Walter K. Marston, 1st year Chemistry 

Frank S. Stevens John L. Field, 2nd year General Cotton 

Manufacturing 

Rotary Club James L. Giblin, 3rd year General 

Cotton Manufacturing 

Massachusetts Charitable Theodore V. Deane, 2nd year General 
Mechanics Association Cotton Manufacturing 

Textile Colorist I^endell Iy. Rudolph, 1st year Chemistry 



PAGE FORTY 



^fje ^Textile JUcorb 



T^xtbzxxtk %~ !$p|)£ 



Mr. Hays, or better known to the boys as " Pop," leaves us 
this year and much to our sorrow. " Pop " has been an all round 
good fellow to more than one of the boys. The name " Pop " 
stuck to him owing to the fatherly interest he took in his students. 
Many of the boys came to " Pop " with their usual youth's troubles 
and k Pop " was ever willing to help them out of their difficulty. 

Mr. Hays is known throughout the trade both in manufactur- 
ing circles as well as in the retail trade and he has been active in 
both of these lines, for a great number of years. 

Mr. Hays is resigning after nearly fifty-five years of active 
work in this line, and we believe that he deserves a rest or should 
we call it rest ? For " Pop " says, that when a man ceases to be 
active he rots and he confides to us that his garden needs fixing 
and his trees and flowers need attention, also his dogs. 4 Pop " is 
a great lover of dogs and his years of experience in this particular 
line has made him a recognized authority. Many prominent 
people come to Mr. Hays, either to purchase dogs, or to secure his 
valuable advice. 

There is one thing that we are sure of and that is of " Pop's " 
friends. Mi. Hays has more friends thru his ever willingness to 
help out, than any man with whom we have ever come into contact. 
No matter where he may travel, to Europe, to Asia, Canada, or 
South America, he will never be lonesome, for his friends are 
world-wide. Mr. Hays has been with us at Durfee Textile for 18 
years and in that time he has taught a great many of boys the art 
of the cotton trade. They never forget him, for he is constantly 
receiving mail from his different scholars, telling him of their 
success or asking him to do some little problem for them which he 
does willingly. 

Well, Mr. Hays, we the Senior Class of '26 bid you good-bye and 
we want to extend to you, the hearty good wishes of the students 
who have graduated in the years gone by. For we know, if they 
were here, that they would feel the regret at our loss, the same as 
we, and may we extend to you our sincere wishes for a pleasant 
rest in your travels and may your solace, in the times when you may 
feel lonely, be the thoughts of the boys, now men, who are wishing 
you every joy and peace in life. Some day, when you turn again 
toward old Durfee Textile, we will all accord you a hearty welcome. 
In saying ki good-bye " we hope it is only for the present. 

C. H. 

PAGE FORTY-ONE 



^{\t ^txtxit JRecorh 




PAGE FORTY-THREE 



©I]c textile JRecrrrfr 




Athletic Association 

Walter K. Marston, '26 President 

Thomas A. McCann, "26 Vice President 

Randolph P. MacBeath, '26 Secretary 

Advisory Board 

Walter E. Marston, Chairman Randolph P. MacBeath, Secretary 

Thomas Gracia, Student Advisor 

C. Nelson Alderman. Faculty Advisor 

Edward V. Carroll, Faculty Treasurer 

The Student Body elected to the Advisory Board a group of 

conscientious men, capable of passing judgment on matters of 

athletics and entertainment. 

Meetings were held at least once a month throughout the 
school year at which they sanctioned the purchase of uniforms and 
supplies, arranged the schedules and the finances of the basket- 
ball and baseball teams. 

Under the auspices of the Athletic Association one social was 
held. This proved to be a financial success as well as very enter- 
taining to the students and their friends. 

All in all the Athletic Association had a very successful year, 
the final reports as to the financial condition of the two teams 
was very gratifying. 



Robert Bannister 
Harold Bradshaw 
Paul Connelly 



Wearers of the "T' 

Basketball 

Randolph MacBeath 
James Connor 



Thomas McCann 
Samuel Stone 
Harry Burstein 



Baseball 



Manager James M. Connors 
Walter E. Marston, 
Paul A. Connelly, 
John P. E. Barnacle, 
Wellington H. King, 
Herbert M. Tickle, 
Thomas Gracia, 
Robert Bannister 
Samuel Stone 



Captain T. Arthur McCann, 
William H. Masterson, 
Harold Bradshaw, 
Harry Burstein, 
Stanley Urban, 
Herman Gersch, 
David E- Posnak 
Randolph P. MacBeath 



PAGE FORTY-FIVE 



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PAGE FORTY-SIX 



"(Efye tEexitle JR^corb 



gasket ^all 



Robert Bannister, Captain Randolph MacBeath, Manager 

Raymond Sullivan, Assistant Manager 

James Worton, Coach 

In November, Coach Worton issued his call for candidates. 

Bannister, MacBeath, McCann and Connor being the men who 

had seen service during the preceding season. Some of the 

promising recruits were Stone, Connelly and Bradshaw. 

As in previous years injuries again held up the squad and it 
was not until the greater majority of the schedule was completed 
that the school was able to muster its full strength. During this 
time the team took on a new lease of life and carried out their 
schedule in a very efficient manner. 

The men to whom letters were awarded are Captain Bannister, 
MacBeath, McCann, Stone, Connelly, Bradshaw, Connor and 
Burstein. 

The men who who will be lost to the team are " Art" McCann, 
" Ranny " MacBeath and ''Jimmy" Connor. These men played 
good consistent basketball during the past season. 

The men who will return next year for the squad are Brad- 
shaw, Connelly, Stone, Bannister, Gersh, Burstein and others 
present in the school have signified their intention of turning out 
for the squad. Textile should have a good team representing her 
on the floor next year. 

Much credit is due Coach Worton for his untiring efforts and 
fine coaching. 



PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 



®ifs ^txith JUcnrfr 



Summary of Season 



Games won — 8 



Games lost — 12 



B. 


D. 


T. 


S. 


18 


Bristol ' v Aggies " 


19 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


18 


Dean Academy 


50 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


47 


St. Mary's High 


19* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


8 


Rogers High 


27 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


18 


Y. M. C. A. Delphis 


41 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


31 


Brown Freshman 


39* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


33 


R. I. School of Design 


28 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


32 


St. Mary's High 


26 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


29 


Rogers' Commercials 


33 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


31 


New Bedford Textile 


18* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


23 


West Warwick High 


24 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


19 


Cushing Academy 


22 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


25 N 


Brown Freshmen 


30 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


17 


Attleboro High 


21 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


25 


Rogers' Commercials 


15* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


29 


New Bedford Textile 


37 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


41 


Y. M. C. A. Delphis 


35* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


32 


Lowell Textile 


39 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


44 


Alumni 


24* 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


55 . 


R.I. School of Design 


24* 








Total— B. D. T. S. 


575 Opponents 571 




*Home Games 







Individual scoring of the players: MacBeath 191, Bannister 126, 
Connelly 116, McCann 69, Bradshaw 38, Stone 22, Burstein 6, 
Connor 4, King 3. 



PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 



^t ^itxtxit jRttoxb 



^zzktt ^all~ji>mmfr ©earn 



Manager Charles M. Hayman Captain James Connor 

It would be unfair not to mention the work of the second 
team, they deserve a great amount of praise for their hard and con- 
scientious work. It was the intention of the scnool to have the 
second team play all the preliminary games when the first team 
played and any other games that could be arranged. This was an 
added attraction, as the second team had quite a reputation. Al- 
though some of the members were a bit small in statue their playing 
ability made up for this handicap of theirs. They played four 
games and won three of them, of course this does not mean that the 
squad was inactive outside of these games for they were always 
called upon to replace men of the first team. 

The squad consisted of the following men : rf, James Con- 
nor, If. H. Burstein, center Chas. M. Hayman, rg. Herman 
Gersh, lg. Wellington King. Jimmy played a very good game all 
through the season and won a place on our first team, as did his 
running mate Heshy Burstein. Charlie had a bit of hard luck at 
the beginning of the season having received a very bad toss at a 
practice session, so bad in fact that he was laid up for nearly three 
weeks with a bad ankle, however he was a hard player and could 
get the tap practically at will. Welly King was a whiz on the floor 
and the Lord only help those that came into contact with him. No 
matter in what game they played Welly did his share. Last but 
not least Hermy Gersh. Hermy was one of the high scorers on 
our team and it had to be a fast man to get through his guarding 
and defense. And so you have met the Second Team whom Coach 
Worton called not the Second Team but First Team Sub's. 

Summary : 

B D. T. S. 32 

B. D. T. S. 14 

B. D. T. S. 26 

B. D. T. S. 45 



Total 



B. D. T. S. 117 



Bristol Aggies 


18 


Delphis Jr. 


29 


Golden Tornadoes 


10 


Delphis 


30 


Opponents 


87 



PAGE FORTY-NINE 



tErre textile ^tcaxb 



^Baseball 



The Textile Baseball Team started the season off in a con- 
spicuous manner by defeating their first opponent. Following 
this the team lost to the Dean Academy, but this team was far 
superior to the Brown and White. Then followed three well 
earned victories giving the team a great amount of courage and 
confidence to finish the season. Every man should receive credit 
for his good work throughout the year and let it be known that 
due appreciation is expressed for their untiring efforts in behalf of 
the School. 

Games on Schedule 

April 14 Holy Family, away 

April 17 Dean Academy, away 

April 24 Somerset High School, away 

April 27 LaSalle Academy, away 

April 29 St. Mary's High School, home 

May 8 New Bedford Textile School, home 

May 12 Holy Family, home 

May 15 New Bedford Textile School, away 

May 17 St. Mary's High School, away 

May 20 Attleboro High School, away 

May 22 Barnstable High School, away 



PAGE FIFTY 



t&Ije textile ^Recorii 



%Ut Club 



A Glee Club was organized in the school in 1925 and its in- 
ception was through the efforts of Mr. Nichols, our principal. This 
club met two or three times a week and was under the guidance of 
Mr. Nelson Terry. 

At first, Mr. Terry gave some preliminary rules that must be 
followed in order to procure the correct pronunciation of words 
in singing and the desired effect as far as harmony is concerned. 
The meetings were greatly enjoyed by the instructors, day students 
and a few night students. Many songs were tried and the club 
progressed rapidly 

We were to try broadcasting at one of the local radio stations, 
but owing to the time limit and the coming examinations the idea 
was given up that term, however it was very evident that each 
and every one of the boys thoroughly enjoyed themselves while 
learning an art that was an asset to any man's hobbies. 

This year for some unknown reason the Glee Club practice 
was not reopened, probably owing to the difficulty of securing a 
leader, but however, we hope to see one here at Textile each suc- 
ceeding year, as they wile away an evening in a most enjoyable 
manner. 



PAGE FIFTY-ONE 



®V WtxtxU ^ttttvb 




1-4 






PAGE FIFTY-TWO 



ftlje ftexttit JUcorh 



P¥ $%* (Sfratermtg 



Alpha — Philadelphia College of Textile Engineering, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Beta — New Bedford Textile School, New Bedford, Mass. 
Gamma — Lowell Textile School, Lowell, Mass. 
DkIvTA — Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River, Mass. 
Eta— North Carolina State College, Raleigh, N. C. 
Thkta — Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. 

^Imtmt (Eljapier JRnll 

Boston New York Philadelphia 

Providence Utica Chicago 

Fall River Northern New Jersey 

faculty; ^embers 

Henry W. Nichols John W. Norman 

C. Nelson Alderman Lucien Schimpf 

Frederick B. Hays William Broomhead 

Assistant Instructor James McArdle 

Thomas Gracia Randolph MacBeath Thomas A. McCann 

Theodore V. Deane James M. Connor Raymond F. Sullivan 

Robert Bannister Karl Reaber, Jr. Herman W. Gersh 

James M. Cooper Paul Connelly Walter Marston 

William Masterson Aime Marquis Wellington H. King 

Herbert Tickle 

Out of a chapter of twenty-six last year, only seven came back 
to us. In October we held our annual smoker, and a promising 
looking lot of freshmen were guests. November 18, we held 
initiation, first and second degrees in perfect form, to eleven new 
canditates, and December 9, our alumni degree team performed 
our third degree, after which we had a successful banquet, many 
from out of town were present. 

April 16, 17 and 18, our annual convention was held in Boston. 
Instead of having it in New Bedford, Beta was good enough to 
have it held in Boston on account of the Textile Exposition being 
there. 

Phi Psi is a national fraternity with six active and eight 
alumni chapters. It was founded in Philadelphia, Pa., on March 
18, 1903, and since then has grown immensely. 



PAGE FIFTY-THREE 



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PAOE FIFTY-FOUR 



®l|£ ®£Xttk ^tCOXb 



£&x$pm ;p}t ©an ^raterttttg 

Organized 1910 
Incorporated 1917 Established in Fall River 1925 

tAttxbt (Eljattto JEnll 

Alpha — Philadelphia Textile School 

Beta — New Bedford Textile School 

Gamma — Bradford Durfee Textile School 

New York, New Bedford, Philadelphia, Fall River 

Active Members 
Charles M. Hayman Sidney Springer David Cohen 

Louis Boxser Henry Helfenbien Benjamin Kalsman 

Samuel Lovit Robert Helfenbien Harry Yoken 

David Posnak Nathan Winograd 

The "Sigma Phi Tau Fraternity" Gamma Chapter was 
admitted on March 1, 1925. Since that time the Chapter has 
been making great progress. Its original membership consisted 
of only seven men. Now after a year of activity the Chapter's 
roll numbers fourteen men. Last year the officers of this 
Chapter were; Charles M. Hayman, Councillor — Mr. Hayman 
has been our most outstanding member, not only for the fact that 
he is our leader but is the man who is largely responsible for 
the presence of this chapter in Fall River. Our next officer is Mr. 
Louis Boxser. Mr. Boxser is our Scribe and one of the charter 
members Next in line is our Exchequer Mr. Samuel Lovit 
another charter member who has done a great deal of work for 
his chapter. Last but not least is Mr. David Posnak our 
Corresponding Scribe also a charter member, Mr. Posnak too 
deserves the equivalent of the foregoing praise for his diligent 
efforts. 

We held, at the beginning of the school year, our smoker, 
invitations were extended to the freshmen, next our banquet for 
our new men, then our first annual dance which surpassed all our 
expectations for success. To close the year another smoker was 
held, after which a theatre party was enjoyed. Then came a fare- 
well banquet to the charter members, The charter men leave this 
year wishing the new men a successful coming year. 

The frat convention was held at Philadelphia on April 9, 10 
and 11, and seven men from the chapter attended, a good time was 
had by all with firm intentions of making next year's trip 100 % 
attendance. 



PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 



®lt* ^Textile JUcorb 



i\ooi (DrcIj£0tra 



In our life at Textile, we could see the need of some sort of 
music. There are many things that we can express in music and 
we felt that, if we organized an orchestra it would be of great use 
to us as far as social activities are concerned and also assist us in 
our dances, broadcasting, etc. 

A call was issued by one of our instructors, Mr. Crawford, 
for any young men who were interested enough to give up their 
time and form an "orchestra. A goodly number of students re- 
sponded and out of these men were selected an orchestra of eight 
pieces, violin, saxaphone, cornet, flute, piano, drums, xylophone 
and banjo. Each one of these men occupy some position on a pro- 
fessional team. 

This orchestra was very ably led by Mr. Henry Helfenbein 
and through Henry's diligent efforts we had some very good re- 
sults. Then came Mr. Nathan Winograd, who can play a flute 
like nobodies' business. Then a most extraordinary cornetist — 
Mr. James Healy. Jimmie's solos were a creditable addition to the 
bunch and when pep and life were needed, Jimmie was the one 
called on. Yes, and here is another good musician, — Mr. David 
Cohen. My, how that boy could tickle those ivories. To Dave, it 
was just as easy to run a scale as it was to run around the block 
His solo, "Irish Confetti" will live long in the memories of his 
school mates. Here we have a fellow who can blow a "sax" under 
the most trying conditions — Mr. Robert Helfenbein. Bob could 
produce some weird notes and how the fellows loved it. Yes, we have 
a banjo too, and an able man at the strings, Mr. L,endell Rudolph. 
When Len started to "jazz it up," the rest of the bunch were sure 
to catch the fever. Still they come. Mr. Ernest Thomas (wow) 
how that boy could make a xylophone talk. Any time our leader 
thought he needed something to pep up the selection, he would 
give a chorus to Ernie and the desired effect would be produced, 



PAGE FIFTY-SIX 



©Ije textile -Hecorh 



and say folks, no band is complete without a drummer and we had 
one that would make you do a Charleston on ice to keep your feet 
from burning up and this yonug genius is in the personage of Mr. 
Benjamin Kalsman. That boy seemed to have two pair of hands. 

You see folks, we certainly had a real bunch of musi- 
cians and they have proven a great success. Only a short while 
after being organized, they were asked to give a program over the 
radio, which they did and to the satisfaction of a lot of fans. Their 
program was sent thru WTAB, Fall River, Mass. Besides this, 
they were asked to play at the Faculty Dinner and all its social 
functions. Their work was enthusiastically received wherever they 
played and we hope that each successive year will see an orchestra 
at Textile under the most able leadership of Mr. Crawford, the 
man behind it all. It might be well to add that Mr. Crawford was 
kind enough to add to the pleasure of our first home game in bas- 
ketball by the presence of our orchestra. This was a great help in 
spurring our boys to victory. 



PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 



%\\t ^txixit T&ttvxb 



(Efyeermg jiguah 



Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! Yes Sir ! We had some cheering squad 
and what pep and precision too. They were organized in 1924, 
and Charlie Hayman was their leader from 1924 to 1925. They 
followed their team to all the games and we can safely say that the 
cheering squad pulled back the spirit of the team on many an 
occasion. 

They first came into prominence at the New Bedford Textile 
game and we cheered our team to a victory to the tune of 36 to 31 
in basketball. This work was kept up until the big trip to Iyowell 
came, and Charlie and his gang well assisted by Pitu Keresy 
cheered for their team. This session seemed more like an endur- 
ance contest for both wind and voice, as there wasn't a quiet 
minute during the whole game, nor was there a clear voice after 
the game. The outstanding feature' of this squad's meeting was 
Wild Pitu's running cheer of nine Rah Rahs. Pitu nearly ran a 
great distance when he broke Frank Campion's expectations. 

The second year came and Charlie had gone out for basket- 
ball, and after contributing some cheers, helped Ray Sullivan get 
the squad organized. Under the direction of Ray, the boys did 
some fine work. They followed their team nearly everywhere, 
but some trips of one hundred miles or more could not be made by 
the entire squad, still some of them always managed to make the 
trip. 

We hope that this squad will always be in action for good 
support is always half the game. 



PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



tElje Grexttle JRecorb 



pijamous |=tyacititg Phrase* 



And such like as that. 

My golly thats good. 

Wulers and wasers gents. 

Step on the gas. 

When I was in the Granite Mills. 

Aw that's terrible. 

Ooooh, well you see. 

Be sure and turn your stuffin'. 

Oo-hoo all right. 

Lecture at 11 boys. 

I'm not getting up in the way of a speech, fellows. 

And the constitutents. 

The Isonomers. 

Hire a hall. 

You must go to Taunton before you get to Boston. 

When I was overseer in 

Pipe down. 
Was so ? 



PAGE FIFTY-NINE 



%\\z ^exiti* JRecnrb 



jSappemttg* to ^tmtmbtx 



The School Dances. 

The Sigma Phi Tau First Anniversary Dance. 

Orchestra Practice. 

Glee Club Practice. 

The night the Orchestra Broadcasted. 

Initiation of the Phi Psi and Sigma Phi Tau men. 

Bank and Durfee Streets, 1.00 to 1.25 P. M. 

The Second Record Book meeting. 

Hayman's room. 

The Football Game. 

The Inter-Frat Basketball Game. 

Phi Psi Convention. 

Charley's room after the First Record Book Dance, 

The Sigma Phi Tau Convention. 

Ten "Flats." 



PAGE -SIXTY 



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PAGE SIXTY-ONE 



®Jt* ^Textile JUtorh 



It is not without deep regret that we, the 
class of 1926, close this chapter of our lives, 
and turn to a new one, of which or what it con- 
tains is not known. This is not the end but 
the beginning of a new era and may it prove to 
be the stepping stone to the heights of success. 

To our honored Principal Mr. Nichols, and 
worthy instructors, goes the deep appreciation 
and gratitude which we humbly proffer, for 
their help and moral support in bringing us to 
the level of men trained, mentally, physically 
and morally to do the portion of labor alloted to 
us. 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO 



tElje tEexitle ^ttoxb 




WIS WIFE: "GET OUT AMD PUSH ALGY; 
IT'S TOO MUCH FOR OT1E DOMKEV.!; 




PAGE SIXTY-THREE 



tUlje ©exttie l&etavb 



Not Found in the Average Garden 

Grass widows 
Widow weeds 
Ambushes 
Family trees 
Pipe stems 
Steamer trunks 
Branch stores 
Silk slips 
Pink envelopes 
Ace of Spades 
Dirty digs 
Dead beats 



" The Ins and Outs of Farm Life " by Theo. Deane 

44 Does Baseball anck Photography Mix" by Scup Masterson 

44 Fourteen Quick Ways to Death " by Lendell Rudolph 

" Successful Baseball Managership " by James Connor 

" How to Get a Dollars Worth Out of a Dime" by R. P. MacBeath 

"Twenty Successful Strangle Holds of My Career' ' by W. K. Marston 

44 Gyping the Public " by T. A. McCann 

" The Yes and Noes of the Queston " by Puzzy Posnak 

44 How to Clip Minutes from School Time " by Jeff Borden 

" Things to Use in a Pinch " by S. L. Lovit 

44 How to be Successful" by C. M. Hayman 

44 How to Make the English Language " by Louie Boxser 

44 There's Peace in a Pipe " by Karl Ellis 

44 How to Win the Women " by Herbert Linny 

Her : 44 What are you thinking of, George ?" 
Him: 4 Oh, nothing much." 
Her : 44 Don't be so conceited." 

44 That's the bunk," shrieked the chambermaid as the fold- 
ing cot fell on her frame. 

Motto of police force in any college town : 4l Don't shoot till 
you see the white of their pajamas, boys !" 

Hi : What do you mean by telling Dot I'm a fool ? 
Harry : I'm sorry— I didn't know it was a secret. 



PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 



t&Ije tUexitle l&ttoxb 



44 What's the matter, little boy ?" 

44 Ma's gone and drowned all the kittens." 

4k Dear me ! That's too bad." 

44 Yep, she — boo-hoo — promised me I could do it." 

Our idea of a go-getter is one who sells a garage to a person 
who has just bought a chance on an automobile. 

Narcissus : Looky here, black man, whut's you all gwine 
gimme for my birthday present ? * 

Black Man : Close yo' eyes, honey (business of closing her 
eyes). Now what yo' see ? 

Narcissus: Nuthin'. 

Black Man : Well, dat's whut you all gwine git. 

Officer : My man, why do you hold on to that lamp post ? 
Drunk: Hie — it tried to walk away, oshiffer, an' I 'ust 
ashed it to tak' me home. 

4 ' Rather a juicy bit this," observed the groom as he re- 
moved the foaming steed's bridle. 

What's wrong with this sentence? 44 She asked him for a 
kiss, but he told her he wasn't that kind of a boy." 

41 In what way does Charley Hayman resemble a piano?" 
Sarcastically, 44 He's upright, square and grand." 

" Those college girls should make wonderful firemen." 

44 Why?" 

44 Because they've had so much experience rolling hose." 

44 I'm certainly getting a lot out of this course," thought 
the chemistry student as he walked home with five dollars' worth 
of equipment in his pockets. 

Our idea of a hard job would be to sell buggy whips in 
Detroit. 

Statistics reveal that for every girl who leaps from a speeding 
car at midnight, fifteen others ought to, but don't. 

Contributor : What's the matter with my jokes ? 
Editor : They're fine except for one little thing. 
Contributor : What's that ? 
Editor : They're not funny. 



PAGE SIXTY-FIVE 



^t textile ^Utnrfr 



Even As You and I 

We have seen taxicabs that weren't yellow. 

We have heard of college men who admit that they study. 

We have seen subway ear windows that were clean. 

We know of a newspaper that has never been owned by 
Frank Munsey. 

We knew a fellow once who passed Chem Two the first time 
he took it. 

But 

We have never heard of a graduating class which didn't 
admit that it was " the best ever." 

Dumb : " Do you know how to make a grapefruit ?" 

Dora: u No." 

Dumb : " Well, it is, anyway." 

The Ball (angrily): Are all men fools? 

The Chain : N No, dear. Some are bachelors. 

Wise One : "I never knew raindrops could smoke." 
Dumb One : k ' Well, it so happens, they can't." 

Wise One : " That's funny, only a few minutes ago I saw 
them in hail." 

Some people are so busy praying for more, that they haven't 
time to give thanks for what they have. 

" Do you know " Scotchy " MacBeath ?" 

"Yes," answered Charley, " generous, open handed fellow 
isn't he?" 

" Well, he just posted a standing offer of $1000 to the widow 
of the unknown soldier." 

Fair Enough 

Better : John, if I fire the cook and cook the meals for 
you what will I get. 

Half : A black dress and a veil. 

Pat had made an automobile trip and upon his arrival home 
he was asked how he enjoyed his trip, he voiced the following 
opinion : 

" Well, oi enjoyed it foine, you know thes fellars Lincoln, 
Jefferson and Dixie built fine roads, but this French guy Detour 
don't know his business." 



PAGE SIXTY-SIX 



^e iRtxtiie ^ttovb 



Farmer to Borden, parked in the moonlight with his Jane : 
11 What's the matter, boy, flat-tire ?" 

Borden : " H 1 no, if she was I would'nt be here." 

Sonse : (Hie) Ish thish the Beauty Shop ? 

Voice on the phone : Yes, what can I do for you ? 

Souse : Well, hie, send one over. 

There is no cold cream that will keep away the wrinkles 
like the milk of human kindness. 

High : You know that manicurist in Hauton's ? 

Sign: Yeah. 

High : Well, she sure nailed me yesterday. 

And the little rabbits all exclaimed : *' We're game." 

A knife in the mouth is worth two in the back. 

Blushing Newlywed : I want a chair big enough for two. 
Wise furniture dealer : Any chair is big enough for two 
if you sit on it right. 

Iyittle Boy : When I grow up I'm going to be a bootlegger. 
Second same (with emphasis) : Aw, so' your old man. 
First again : Ya ! An' he's a mighty good one, too. 

A cynic is one who believes the reason a woman closes her 
eyes when she is being kissed is that she may more perfectly create 
the illusion that she is kissing another man. 

She : What are your views on kissing ? 

He : I have none. Her hair always gets in my eyes. 

Say a prayer for Ephriam Brown — 

He was trying to float, but he learned to drown. 

" Life !" cried the judge. 

''Hooray !" cried the prisoner, " The Bars and Stripes forever!" 

Say, that cucumber sure has got itself into a fine pickle. 

Old gentleman : Yes, my boy, when I was your age, I 
could run 100 yards in ten seconds. 

Skeptical youth : What did they use to time you with in 
those days, sun-dials ? 



PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN 



t^Ip ^Ltxtxlt JRscorh 



(&nx JVftfrerttsers 



PAGE SIXTY-NINE 



®Ije ^txtiit JRecorh 




Compliments of 



American Printing Company 




*■«««««.■•»' 



HENRY L. SCOTT CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



TESTING MACHINES 



PROVIDENCE 



RHODE ISLAND 



PAGE SEVENTY 



^t tlUxitle l&etavb 




PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 



tdlje textile H&etaxb 



PRESIDENT 
FRANK B. KENNY 



VICE PRESIDENT 
CLARENCE R. HOWE 



TREASURER 
MARSHALL F. CUMMINGS 



T. C. ENTWISTLE COMPANY 



Warping Machinery 



LOWELL 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Phi Psi Fraternity 


Sigma 'Phi Tau Fraternity 


Delta Chapter 


Gamma Chapter 



PAGE SEVENTY-TWO 



®i]e ©Exitle JUcorh 



The Stafford Company 

Manufacturers of Weaving Machinery 



Stafford Automatic Looms 

For weaving all manner of textile fabrics, plain and fancy, 
course or fine. Stafford Looms can be supplied with either 
shuttle or bobbin changing automatic features. 



Dobbies, Box Motions, 
Fancy Weaving Motions 



The Stafford Company 

READVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Southern Agent Canadian Agents 

Fred H. White, Charlotte, N. C. Whitehead, Emmans, Ltd., Montreal, P. Q. 



PAGE SEVENTY-THREE 



®lj* %*xtxl* jBLtzttvb 



Emmons Loom Harness Co. 

Cotton Harness, Mail Harness and Reeds 

ALSO 

Jacquard Heddles 

For Weaving Cotton, Silk and Woolen Goods 

LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Shovelton Garage 

Qr easing, Washing, Storage 

Free Crank Case Service 

Goodyear Tires 
Sales and Service 

Tydol Gas Veedol Oil 

Fords Rented Without T)rivers 

Telephone 3318 

26 Troy Street 
Fall River Massachusetts 



H. C. Talbot Co. 

Complete line of 
Men's Furnishings, Sporting togs 
Men's and Young Men's 
Clothing and Athletic wear 

A trial with us will make you a 
steady customer 

Special Attention Given to Men 
attending the Textile School 

SOUTH MAIN STREET 

Opp. Brady's Drug Store 



PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR 



©If* fttxtite ^Btovb 



E 



££SONA 

REG. U. S. PAT. OFFj 



Machines for Improving Quality 
and Reducing Production Costs 
Through Scientific Winding 

UNIVERSAL WINDING is known and recog- 
nized in every country in the world where 
modern methods are employed in textile 
manufacture. 

No single factor has contributed more to the de- 
velopment of the textile industry. Cotton, Woolen, 
L,inen, Silk and Rayon manufacturers have proven the 
economy of Universal Winding. 

You will find it interesting and to your advantage 
to become familiar with Universal Winding machines 
and their many uses in textile manufactures. 

Your career may take you to the far corners of 
the world, but you will find a Universal Winding 
engineer handy to help you solve many manufacturing 
problems by scientific efficient winding. 

UNIVERSAL WINDING 

Providence. UUIVlJ^AiN * Philadelphia. 

Chicago, Utica. Charlotte. 

New York. O tti CTHM Atlanta. 

DEPOTS AND OFFICES AT MANCHESTER AND PARIS 

Montreal and Hamilton, Canada 




<J 



PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE 



%\\* ®exttie JEetorh 



STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 

MAIN OFFICE AND FACTORY 
2100 West Allegheny Ave. Philadelphia, Pa. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

THE FLAT STEEL HEDDLE 

Harness Frames 

Drop Wires and Heddles 

Jacquard Heddles and Lingoes 
Doup or Leno Harness 

Soldered and Pitch Band Reeds 
of every description 

BRANCH OFFICE: 44 FRANKLIN ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
BRANCH AND FACTORY: 621 E. McBEE AVE., GREENVILLE, S. C. 




SAMPLES AND SAMPLES 

When we send out FREE samples, we do not send just one or two so that you can 
merely look at them. All ring travelers look about alike. 

We send a sufficient supply so you can set up several frames with them and really 
test them. We believe that the proof of the travelers is in the running. You can 
get your FREE sample Victors by dropping a postal card to our nearest office. 

VICTOR RING TRAVELER COMPANY 

20 MATHEWSON STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Southern Agent A. B. Carter, Room 615, Third National Bank Bldg., Gastona, N.C. 



THE REILLY PRESS 
PRINTERS 



PAGE SEVENTY-SIX 



®Ije ©exitle Jtecorh 



Largest Job Dyers of Yarn in 
the United States 







Greenville Plant 



Philadelphia Plai|i 



All Classes of Colors from Ordinary Direct to Best 

WE RECEIVE yarn on bobbins, tubes, cones 
or cops, dye it on Universal wound parallel 
tubes and return it to you, without waste, 
on these tubes or on cones. 

We also receive worsted yarns on jackspools, dye it 
on our special perforated dyeing spools and return it to 
you on the original jackspools. 

The Franklin Process eliminates skeins and long 
chains, thus reducing yarn waste to a negligible quantity. 
This saving is particularly important in the dyeing of fine 
count yarns. Here also we can probably save you con- 
siderable money in the cost of actual dyeing. 

OUR YARN DEPARTMENT can afford you every 
facility for purchasing your grey yarn requirements 
through us if you so desire. This service saves you much 
bookkeeping and substantially reduces transportation 
costs. 

IF YOU WISH TO DO YOUR OWN DYEING 
we are prepared to sell you Franklin Dyeing Machines. 

FRANKLIN PROCESS COMPANY 

Yarn Dyers - Yarn Spinners - M'f'rs Glazed Yarns - Dyeing Machines 

Philadelphia . PROVIDENCE . Manchester, Eng. 

New York Office 72 Leonard Street 

SOUTHERN FRANKLIN PROCESS COMPANY 

Greenville, S. C. 

CENTRAL FRANKLIN PROCESS COMPANY 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 





PAGE SEVENTY-SEVEN 



^t textile •Esccrft 




MODEL A DOUBLE WOOLEN SHEAR 



SPRINGFIELD DOUBLING WINDER 




Brushing 

Boiling 

Decating 

Doubling 

Examining 

Finishing 



TWO CYLINDER GIG 



Gigging 

Inspecting 

Kaumagraphing 

Lustering 

Measuring 

Napping 



DRY GOODS TRANSFEROTOR CLOTH TRADEMARKER 
MACHINES FOR 



Packaging 

Perching 

Picking 

Polishing 

Pumicing 

Rolling 



Sanding 

Shearing 

Sponging 

Steaming 

Stretching 

Tigering 



Teaseling 

Trademarking 

Waxing 

Weighing 

Winding 

Yardnumbering 



PARKS & W00LS0N MACHINE COMPANY 



SPRINGflELD VERMONT 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 



®be ©exttle JRetnrb 



Fyans, Fraser & Blackway Co 



BENNETT BUILDING 



FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



NEW AND LITTLE USED 



TEXTILE MACHINERY 



Southern Agents 

Southern Textile Machinery Co. 
Greenville, S. C. 



General Warehouses 
Warren, R. I. 



PAGE SEVENTY-NINE 



®lj* ®Bxtii« JRpcorh 



All successful people are moving toward a definite goal. 
Likewise successful products such as the 

Wyandotte Textile Alkalies 

are made for a definite purpose. 

These special purpose alkalies are designed to assist the 
mill man in producing that soft texture, bright color, and lofty 
appearance which distinguish quality textiles. 

So many mill men are obtaining these results much more 
favorably than with ordinary alkalies that these Wyandotte Pro- 
ducts deserve the opportunity of proving their value to you. 



"WpandotU' 



One trademark Card 




j CD* 

1 ; 



'k£TuatDir» 

CIk J. B, ford companp. 
wpajout. ntkk. a. i a 



Ask Sour Supply Man 

THE J. B. FORD CO 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 
WYANDOTTE, MICH. 



Quality Products for 50 Years 

We are satisfying many particular 
Weavers. May we have the 
opportunity to please you ? 

Products for All Fabrics 

Walker Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

Established 1875 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Reeds, Heddles and Heddle Frame* 



Heddles 

Plain and Inserted Eye 

Liece Reeds 

Beaming Raithes 

Patent Wire Dupe Harness 



Southern Office 

101 Augusta Street 

Greenville, S. C. 

Main Office and Factory 

Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

'THE DESCO'S 

Second Year Designing 
Third Year General Cotton 

T. D. J. F. T. G. C. H. W. M. 



99 



PAGE EIGHTY 



tElf* ^ItxtUt j&ttoxb 




PACIFIC MILLS 

Lawrence, Mass. Columbia, S. C. Dover, N. H. Lyman, S. C. 



are the largest manufacturers in the world of 
Printed, Dyed and Bleached Cotton Goods and 
Cotton-Warp and All- Wool Dress Goods. 
Their products are always of uniform excel- 
lence, invariably give dependable service, and 
are sold the world around at reasonable prices. 



LAWRENCE & CO., Selling Agents 

Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, San Francisco 

Manchester, England 



PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 



tftrre ^Itxixlt ^{ztavb 



Borden & Remington Co. 



£*<sMfc- 



tome® 



Textile Finishers' Supplies 



Manufacturers of 

{Qoremco 

"Paints, 

Varnishes 

and Stains 



For the Interior of Buildings 

BOREMCO FLAT WALL PAINT 

A beautiful sanitary paint for walls and 
ceilings 

BOREMCO MILL WHITE 

An extremely white and enduring paint for 

the interior of factories and industrial 

plants, etc. 

EXTRA-LITE 

A snow white oil enamel paint, drying with 

a high gloss, for the highest grade 

of interior work 



Salesroom, 748 Pleasant Street 

Factory, 115 Anawan Street Telephone 6020 

Distributors of Dependable Merchandise since 1837 



. SOKOLL CO 

Established 1880 

Confectioners and Caterers 



o 



Frozen Dainties 
Fancy Pastry 



High Grade Candies 
Dinner Favors 



32 North Main Street 



PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 



®I}£ tEexitk JUcorfr 



K-A Electrical Warp Stop for Looms 



The Warp Stop with a twenty year record of highest 
efficiency and accelerated growth. 

The K-A Electrical Warp Stop is a superior "motion" 
because it is electrical. 

It does not depend upon continuously agitated mech- 
anism in functioning. 

It acts with unequal promptness when a drop wire 
falls — and only then. 

It reduces the amount of fixing. 

It increases production by minimizing loom stoppage 
due to % 'warp stop" repair and adjustment. 

It is the most readily adaptable to varying conditions. 

That is why we are increasing our facilities. 

That is why every mill man should learn facts concern- 
ing our K-A Electrical. 



For K-A Facts Inquire 

Rhode Island Warp Stop Equipment Co. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 



PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 



®Jjj> textile j&ttarb 



Compliments of 

Byron W. Anthony, Jr. 



Compliments of 

Walter E. O'Hara 



Compliments of 

George D. Flynn, Jr. 



Compliments of 

Mayor Edmond P. Talbot 



PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR 



®lj8 textile JRernrb 




AUTOMATIC 

BOX 



LOOMS 



FOR 



PRACTICALLY 



ALL 



FABRICS 



Our Experience and Service are at Your Disposal 



Crompton & Knowles Loom Works 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

PROVIDENCE. R.I. PHILAOtCLPHIA.PA. PATERSON. N.J. 



ALLBNT1}WN, PA. 



PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 



tEhe textile JRecurb 



BLEACHING MERCERIZING DYEING DRYING 

PRINTING AND FINISHING MACHINERY 

FOR 

FINISHING ALL KINDS OF FABRICS AND COTTON WARP YARNS 

Jill of the machinery We build is of the highest 
quality materials and workmanship 

We will gladly send a sales engineer to go over with you 
in detail any equipment in which you are interested. 






Smith Office Equipment Co. 




BEDFORD STREET 




Specialist in Office Furniture 


Fall T^iver Alumni Chapter 


COMPLETE LINE OF 




Typewriters Files 


^Phi 'Psi Fraternity 


Stationery 




AND 




All Office Furniture 




Special attention given 




to Textile Students 



PAGE EIGHTY-SIX 



®1je (Bexttle Jlecorh 




te Equipmi 

Machinen 

by Specialists 



WOONSOCKET MACHINE AND PRESS CO., Inc. 

WOONSOCKET, R. I. 



Hopper Bale Breakers 
Vertical Openers 
Horizontal Cleaners 
Conveying Systems 
Distributing Systems 
Hopper Feeders 
Self-feeding Openers 
Roving and Hard 
Waste Openers 
Thread Extractors 



Intermediate and 
Finisher flappers 

Revolving Flat Cards 

Drawing Frames 

Slubbers / 

Intermediates 

Roving Frames I 1 

Jack Frames [ I 

Roving Spindles and 11 
Flyers 



FALES & JENKS MACHINE COMPANY 

PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

Ring Spinning Frames for cotton. 

Ring Twisters for cotton, wool, worsted, 
linen, jute and novelty yarns. 

Ring Spinning and Twister Spindles, 
plain and ball bearing. 




EASTON & 



Spoolers 

Skein Winders 

Automatic Banding 
Machines 

Slasher Warpers 



ACHINE COMPANY 



PAWTUCKET, R. I. 

Ball Warpers 

Reels 

Card Grinders 

Spindles for Cotton 
or Silk 



v^-refiT^.',, 



Main Office and Export Agent : PAWTUCKET, R. 1. 
Southern Office: GREENVILLE, S. C. 



PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 



®Ije textile Jletorfc 



H. M. BUNKER & CO.. INC. 

56 WORTH STREET NEW YORK CITY 

Producing Bias Cloths in 

Cambrics and Lawns 

White and Colored 

Put up on Rolls Ready for Slicing into Tape 



SHIPMENTS MADE FROM FALL RIVER 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT 



®he textile jt&etavb 



Compliments 
of 

D. Bernard Golding 



PAGE EIGHTY-NINE 



3Eifc fEsxttU JRecorh 



Compliments of 

The Bradford Durfee Textile School 
Alumni Association 

Annual Business Meeting and Banquet 
Saturday Preceding. Graduation 

All Day Graduates Eligible for Membership 



PAGE NINETY 



gin 



T0 



Date Loaned 





to